W1AW/x operation


Tom O'Brien
 

To the ARRL:

In some activations of W1AW/x, I have observed some poor operating practices. The W1AW/x operations should always adhere to best practices, if for no other reason than to serve as a good example to participating stations.

One poor practice in particular is the one I observed last night, from W1AW/0 in ND. When I tuned in, the W1AW/0 operator was operating "split", but failed to announce, for at least 20 minutes, that he was doing so. As a result, many stations called on his frequency (14.265), while he was listening on 14.270. While that was going on, the "police" announced, "up five", "he's operating split", etc. When the operator eventually announced his calling/listening frequencies, he reversed them, which surely did not help. I think he was confused and operating an unfamiliar radio.

Another poor practice, which I have not witnessed, but have heard of from a very experienced DXer, was that one (or more) of the W1AW/x stations fired up in the middle of a DX window, without the courtesy of asking for the frequency. It's a common mistake, but it does lead to hard feelings and a poor reflection on the League.

I have worked several of the W1AW/x stations, and have been generally pleased with the results. There have been only a few poor operations.

Since this activity is going to continue for the rest of 2014, please take the time to train these volunteers in better operating practices. It will reflect well on them and on the League.

Sincerely,
Tom O'Brien, AB5XZ
San Antonio, Texas
DXCC, WAS, WAZ
Licensed since 1957
ARRL member since 1957


King White
 

Good on ya, Tom. I noticed it too last night. Lots of confusion ensued. 
Your email was polite and right on point. 

King "KD" White
W5WJR
Sent from KD's iPhone

On Apr 17, 2014, at 11:17 AM, Tom OBrien <tpobrienjr@...> wrote:

 

To the ARRL:

In some activations of W1AW/x, I have observed some poor operating practices. The W1AW/x operations should always adhere to best practices, if for no other reason than to serve as a good example to participating stations.

One poor practice in particular is the one I observed last night, from W1AW/0 in ND. When I tuned in, the W1AW/0 operator was operating "split", but failed to announce, for at least 20 minutes, that he was doing so. As a result, many stations called on his frequency (14.265), while he was listening on 14.270. While that was going on, the "police" announced, "up five", "he's operating split", etc. When the operator eventually announced his calling/listening frequencies, he reversed them, which surely did not help. I think he was confused and operating an unfamiliar radio.

Another poor practice, which I have not witnessed, but have heard of from a very experienced DXer, was that one (or more) of the W1AW/x stations fired up in the middle of a DX window, without the courtesy of asking for the frequency. It's a common mistake, but it does lead to hard feelings and a poor reflection on the League.

I have worked several of the W1AW/x stations, and have been generally pleased with the results. There have been only a few poor operations.

Since this activity is going to continue for the rest of 2014, please take the time to train these volunteers in better operating practices. It will reflect well on them and on the League.

Sincerely,
Tom O'Brien, AB5XZ
San Antonio, Texas
DXCC, WAS, WAZ
Licensed since 1957
ARRL member since 1957


David Espinoza - W5QS
 

I also noticed it while I was working W100AW in Newington.  I heard them on .270 so I moved to 14.280.   Made 222 contacts in 6 about hours.  

73 de w5qs

On Apr 17, 2014, at 11:17, Tom OBrien <tpobrienjr@...> wrote:

 

To the ARRL:

In some activations of W1AW/x, I have observed some poor operating practices. The W1AW/x operations should always adhere to best practices, if for no other reason than to serve as a good example to participating stations.

One poor practice in particular is the one I observed last night, from W1AW/0 in ND. When I tuned in, the W1AW/0 operator was operating "split", but failed to announce, for at least 20 minutes, that he was doing so. As a result, many stations called on his frequency (14.265), while he was listening on 14.270. While that was going on, the "police" announced, "up five", "he's operating split", etc. When the operator eventually announced his calling/listening frequencies, he reversed them, which surely did not help. I think he was confused and operating an unfamiliar radio.

Another poor practice, which I have not witnessed, but have heard of from a very experienced DXer, was that one (or more) of the W1AW/x stations fired up in the middle of a DX window, without the courtesy of asking for the frequency. It's a common mistake, but it does lead to hard feelings and a poor reflection on the League.

I have worked several of the W1AW/x stations, and have been generally pleased with the results. There have been only a few poor operations.

Since this activity is going to continue for the rest of 2014, please take the time to train these volunteers in better operating practices. It will reflect well on them and on the League.

Sincerely,
Tom O'Brien, AB5XZ
San Antonio, Texas
DXCC, WAS, WAZ
Licensed since 1957
ARRL member since 1957